Religion + Rebuilding in New Orleans: In-depth reporting/Quark project

My senior capstone project for Notre Dame’s Minor in Catholic Social Tradition. I received a grant to go to New Orleans and interview Catholic Charities officials, a journalist from the Times-Picayune and parishioners at St. Gabriel the Archangel.

St. Gabe’s was nearly destroyed by Hurricane Katrina but its parishioners and staff helped rebuild the Pontchartrain Park and Gentilly Woods communities.

After writing the copy, I assembled it and my photos into a magazine-like packet using Quark Xpress.

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"SupernaturalGIRL!" - A magazine-style satire project made using InDesign and Photoshop for my American Studies senior seminar on postfeminism. 
May 2011
Click image to view entire project through my Issuu library.

"SupernaturalGIRL!" - A magazine-style satire project made using InDesign and Photoshop for my American Studies senior seminar on postfeminism. 

May 2011

Click image to view entire project through my Issuu library.

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University of Notre Dame College of Arts & Letters: “Theology Alumnus Strives for Social Justice”
My profile of Tom Hampson, a Notre Dame alumnus who now works with Church World Service. Shown on the Arts & Letters homepage, bottom left.

“Where the world’s need and your passion intersect, that’s the sweet spot,” he says.

University of Notre Dame College of Arts & Letters: “Theology Alumnus Strives for Social Justice”

My profile of Tom Hampson, a Notre Dame alumnus who now works with Church World Service. Shown on the Arts & Letters homepage, bottom left.

“Where the world’s need and your passion intersect, that’s the sweet spot,” he says.

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The Elkhart Truth: Jimtown grad writes songs, crunches numbers

For a country singer who croons for a living, Zach DuBois is no romantic when it comes to his career. The Elkhart, Ind., native taught himself to play guitar, but he took a entrepreneurship class at the University of Notre Dame to prepare himself for the competitive business of performing on stage.

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My posts for The Basement

Talking about pop culture and sports. I also oversee a biweekly feature, “A Fortnight’s Best,” and chip in with editing contributors’ posts. A WordPress blog.

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My Twitter

@jo_rae

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The Observer: Is this real life?

One of my turns at the Inside Column, a daily column written by members of the production staff for The Observer.

Thanks November. It’s been surreal

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Notre Dame Magazine: Thank God It's Friday! Really!!

Profile of a Notre Dame student who’s been sending out “Happy Friday!” e-mails, theological meditations wrapped in waiting-for-the-weekend joy, for the last three years.

McCarty is humble enough on her own, even without the critiques. She doesn’t allow herself to take too much credit for the sheer number of words she’s generated. She says a lot of the writing, especially the Heart of the Email, just comes organically from things she’s learned.

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The Observer: Diversity takes center stage

Reporting on a tense moment in the student arts scene at Notre Dame, when a production of the musical “Parade” drew allegations that those in charge were excluding African-American students from auditioning.

Senior Erdina Francillon is the president of Shades of Ebony, and was one of the student leaders that worked with PEMCo. She said she understood the hesitation to “break the mold” in any play with roles not written for diverse actors, but she feels that “Parade” was a poor choice of musical to perform during Black History Month.

"People are missing the point that minorities don’t always want to play these stereotypical roles," Francillon said.

Francillon said she hopes that the workshop will give PEMCo. an audience of more diverse students while also shaking up preconceptions about racial typecasting.

"These communities exist on campus — they’re performing communities … It’s the recruiting message [from PEMCo.] that isn’t effective," Francillon said.

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Catholic News Service: Seminarians learn and discern as college undergraduates

First in a series of articles I wrote in the summer of 2009 about college undergraduates preparing to join the Catholic priesthood.

"We find it a great asset to be able to be here on campus," said Holy Cross Father Kevin Russeau, director of Old College and himself an alum of the program, in a phone interview.

The “Old Collegians” live in their own residence hall, a tiny, 166-year-old brick building that survives from the university’s founding. Father Russeau said its number of occupants has fluctuated in the last decade: from 18 in 1999, down to four in 2006, and up to a crowded 22 this fall.

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South Bend Tribune: New home, old studios: WNIT settles into former WSBT building

Front-page story about a PBS affiliate moving into studios once occupied by the local news station.

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Catholic News Service: Torture survivors testify at Human Rights Commission hearing

WASHINGTON – Torture survivors and advocates implored Congress June 25 to investigate allegations of military torture of war prisoners, saying that the U.S. must be an example for other countries in respect for human rights.

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Catholic News Service: Religious priests and diocesan priests: What's the difference?

One in a series of articles I wrote in the summer of 2009 about college undergraduates preparing to join the Catholic priesthood.


Holy Cross Father Ed Obermiller, vocations director for his community’s Indiana province, said that some young men join the congregation’s undergraduate seminary looking toward religious priesthood but later feel pulled to diocesan work.

"They have to be clearly discerning religious life (when they enter). But if they start to see that they’re called to something else, we’re not going to say, ‘That’s it, you’re out.’ We’ll give them the tools that we can," he said. "We’re helping to educate men for ministry, for priesthood, so that’s our gift to the church."

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Catholic News Service: Vocation directors use Internet, prayer to reach candidates

Second in a series of articles I wrote in the summer of 2009 about college undergraduates preparing to join the Catholic priesthood.

To open up the pathways of information, the diocese reached out to college campuses with monthly dinners and launched a Web site, priestforever.org, to appeal specifically to men considering the priesthood.
 
"Young people are more hands-on, they are more savvy. They get online, they network with one another, they travel to see different seminaries," said Father Doerr.

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